Percy Ernest Foot

Date of birth:                     1881
Place of birth:                    Southampton
Date of marriage:             1906
Place of marriage:            Southampton
Service No.:                        43061
Rank:                                     Armourer’s Mate
Regiment / Division:      Royal Navy
Vessel:                                   HMS Monitor No. 15
Died:                                      11th November 1917 aged 36 years
Death Location:                At sea off the Palestinian Coast

Life before the War
Percy was born 1881 Southampton to parents William and Elizabeth.  His father was born in 1840 in London and died 1895 Southampton.  His mother was born 1844 and sister Ada in 1876, both in Southampton.

Percy married Emily Amelia Barber 1906 Southampton.

The 1881 census shows Percy was living with his parents William and Elizabeth and sister Ada at 14 Upper Portland Terrace, All Saints, Southampton.  William was a Plumber and General Dealer, which was his own business, Elizabeth was an Attendant at the shop.

In the 1891 census Percy was still living with his parents and sister Ada.  His parents are still running their shop at 14 Upper Portland Terrace, Southampton.

By the 1901 census Percy had joined the Royal Navy.  He was living at the Royal Sailors Rest, Portsmouth, Hampshire.  His father had died so his mother was running the shop with the help of a servant.

Again in the 1911 census Percy was still serving in the Royal Navy and was living at the Royal Sailors Rest, 74 – 174 Commercial Road, Portsmouth.  No sign of his wife Emily.

War service
Percy had already served a long period of time with the Royal Navy, joining in 1899 before World War I started.  He was killed in action on 11 November 1917, along with 25 members of the crew, when his ship was torpedoed.

He is Remembered with Honour on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

After the First World War an appropriate way had to be found of commemorating those members of the Royal Navy who had no known grave, the majority of deaths having occurred at sea where no permanent memorial could be provided.

An Admiralty committee recommended that the three manning ports in Great Britain – Chatham, Plymouth and Portsmouth – should each have an identical memorial of unmistakable naval form, an obelisk, which would serve as a leading mark for shipping.  The memorials were designed by Sir Robert Lorimer, who had already carried out a considerable amount of work for the Commission, with sculpture by Henry Poole.  The Portsmouth Naval Memorial was unveiled by the Duke of York (the future George VI) on 15 October 1924.

Historical Information
HMS M-15 built by W. Gray & Co. Ltd., West Hartlepool in 1915 and owned at the time of her loss by Royal Navy, was a British monitor of 540 tons.

On November 11th 1917 HMS M-15 was sunk by a torpedo from the German submarine UC-38, commanded by Hans Hermann Wendlandt, at Deir el Balah off the Palestine coast.  26 persons were lost.

National Roll of the Great War
“Foot, P. E., Armourer’s Mate R.N. 343061
He enlisted in the Royal Navy in October 1899 and during the war first saw service in the North Sea with H.M.S. “St. Vincent”.  This vessel was engaged on important patrol duties with the Grand Fleet.  He also took part in the naval operations in the Dardenelles and later went to H.M. Monitor No. 15.  He served with this vessel in the Suez Canal and off the coast of Palestine and whilst assisting in the bombardment of Jaffa was killed in action on November 11th 1917.  He had completed eighteen years with the Royal Navy and was entitled to the 1914 – 1915 Star and the General Service and Victory Medals.
3 Woodside Terrace, Portswood, Southampton”

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