Albert Alexander J. Lauder

Date of birth: December 1894
Place of birth: Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire
Regiment: Royal Engineers
Battalion: 8th Signal Coy.
Rank / Service No: Pioneer, 222129
Died: 3rd July 1917, aged 22 years
Commemorated: Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial

 

Albert was the oldest of 3 siblings born to Lawrence Alexander and Clare Elizabeth Lauder (nee Humphries), who married in Scarriff, Co. Clare in 1892.

The family spent many years in Ireland, despite neither parent having been born there.

 

They were in Buncranna, Co .Donegal at the 1901 Census, and at Emlagh Co. Sligo at the 1911 Census.

By 1917, the family had moved to Southampton and were living at 8 Tennyson Road, Portswood.

 

Lawrence, a surveyor, was born in Wilmslow on 21 December 1871. He died in Wickham in 1944, leaving £1654 8s to one Christina Stuart.

Interestingly, Lawrence was in Nicosia, Cyprus in 1919.

 

Clare was born in Melton Mowbray on 19 February 1860 and she also passed away in Wickham in 1944.

 

Siblings

Albert Alexander J. 

Reginald Walter Matthew   b. 28 October 1896 Kilrush, Co. Clare   d. 1977 Wales   Married Victoria Harris in Stourbridge in 1934.

Mary Patricia   b. 1902 Thurles, Co. Tipperary   d. ??   Married Ralph L. Warren in Southampton in 1921. Married John T. Graham in Southampton in 1968.

 

Albert originally attested into the 12th Battalion of the Rifle Brigade (#S2543) on 8 September 1914, at Winchester.

It is known he was in France with his battalion on 21 July 1915 and he was awarded the Military Medal when in the Rifle Brigade.

 

He was promoted to Corporal on 16 May 1916, when he was in action around Rouen.

 

On 5 October 1916, Albert was invalided to England on HMS Aberdonian with flu. He was in hospital in Southampton on 17 October and was discharged on 23 October, but was sent home for a further week.

 

On 11 December 1916, Albert transferred to the Royal Engineers. His Certificate of Trade Proficiency shows he was tested on 13 December 1916 in the workshops of the Signal Depot at Fenny Stratford, where he was described as “an indifferent office telegraphist.”

 

There are no details of Albert’s demise, but he perished on the first day of the Third Battle of Ypres.

 

 

Researcher: Mark Heritage
Published: 7th November 2016
Updated:

 

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